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Bats for Biodiversity is a group that supports each other in Community Bat Monitoring to increase awareness of bats in our environment.

 

Microbats

Anyone having problems with microbats in the roof helpful information is available.

This link shows microbat exclusion methods. Making a one-way flap so they can get out but not back in in the solution.

Microbats are mammals. Although covered with fur, microbats are warm-blooded placental animals and they nourish their young with milk produced by the mothers.
Bats share our senses -- smell, hearing, sight and touch -- but they have the added benefits of flight and an exceptional system of navigation and prey detection. Unlike flying foxes, microbats use echolocation to detect objects (although they can see). They produce high frequency sound pulses through the nose or mouth. A flap of skin in front of the ear directs the returning echoes to make a ‘sound picture’.
When cruising microbats emit about 10 pulses per second. When an insect is detected the pulses go up to over 100 per second.

There are dozens of species of microbats in our region, ranging from 3 to 30 grams. Many are on the Threatened Species list. Most roost in tree hollows or under bark but some species take up residence in building cavities.

These petite creatures generally live in colonies of half a dozen. They are excellent insect controllers, consuming 50% of their body weight in insects every night.

Their droppings are not known to be a source of disease and will dry quickly with little or no odour. Microbats are clean and sociable animals that will not gnaw wood, wires or insulation.

They'll clean up your mozzies and be no trouble to you.

 

Eastern Horseshoe bat

Rhinolophus megaphyllus

Echolocation is a constant 68-75 kHz and mean weight of these cute little goobies is 10gr

Image by Alicia Carter
Image by Alicia Carter
Image by Alicia Carter
Image by Juile Reid
Image by Lib Ruytenberg

 

Eastern Falsistrelle

falsistrellis tasmaniensis

 

Image by Lib Ruytenberg
Image by Lib Ruytenberg

 

Gould's long eared bat

Nyctophilus gouldi

Image by Kim Moore-Evans
Image by Lib Ruytenberg

 

Gould’s Wattled bat

 

 
Image by Lib Ruytenberg

 

Eastern Bentwing

miniopterus orianae oceanensis

 

 
( unfurred pup ) Image by Lib Ruytenberg
 

 

Eastern Freetail Microbat

 

Image by Lib Ruytenberg
Image by Lib Ruytenberg
Image by Lib Ruytenberg
Image by Lib Ruytenberg

 

Yellow-bellied Sheathtail Microbat

saccolaimus flaviventris

 

Image by Lib Ruytenberg
Image by Lib Ruytenberg
Image by Lib Ruytenberg
Image by Lib Ruytenberg

 

Bentwing Microbat

Miniopterus australis

Threatened species

 

 
Image by Lib Ruytenberg

Updated January 11, 2017  

Webmaster: Susanne Ulyatt

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