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Red-Necked wallaby joey in care Nicki Red-necked wallaby in care

 

Red-Necked Wallaby

Macropus Rufogriseus

Video of wallaby joys being fed whilst in care click here

The Red-necked wallaby is reddish brown with grey tips on the fur, pronounced reddish-brown neck, paler grey chest. It has a black muzzle, white stripe on the upper lip, paws and largest toe are black ( looks a bit like they have socks on).

This wallaby is fairly common in Queensland , northeastern New South Wales and Tasmania. It lives in eucalypt forests, where you would find open areas nearby, and in tall coastal heath areas. It is a grazing animal, eating mainly grasses and herbs.

The Red-necked Wallaby is mainly solitary, but will be seen grazing together at night, if disturbed they will scatter in all directions.They shelter in dense patches of forest during the day, coming out early evening just before dusk to graze.

The Female will start breeding at app. 14months old, and will from there on nearly always have a young in her pouch, the pouch life is about 280 days, and the joey will continue to be suckled till it is 12-17 months old. The males will start breeding at app. 19 months of age.

They breed all year round in most states, except Tasmania, where the breeding season is from January to July.The Red-necked wallaby is protected by law in all states

Reference: The Australian museum "Complete book of Australian Mammals".
Ronald Strahan. "Encyclopedia of Australian Animals"
The Australian Museum."The National Photographic index of Australian Wildlife."
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Updated January 11, 2017  

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