EMERGENCY INFORMATION

When finding a native animal in distress it will be in shock and extremely stressed. Native animals do not show stress like domestic pets, they will be silent and try to hide their injuries, because in the wild an injured animal is easy prey. If it is in your yard, lock up any domestic pets, even if you feel your pet may not be a risk to the animal, just being there is enough to stress the native animal, and stress can kill. Native animals are not used to being handled by humans. Improper handling can cause injury. The animal will struggle, and may hurt itself more. Do NOT try to give it water or food; it will not want to eat. Call WIRES or your nearest wildlife organisation as soon as possible. Australian female Marsupials have a pouch. Please check the pouch of any female marsupial, even if she is already dead, joeys within the pouch may be very much alive. Please do not be tempted to care for native animals yourself. Unfortunately it inevitably ends in disaster, as native animals need specialist care and specialised food. All Wires carers are trained to care for these animals. If you are interested in native animals consider joining Wires. Remember: It is against the law to keep native animals taken from the wild. They must be passed onto a registered wildlife rescue organisation. It can be exciting for children having a native animal and very tempting to want to look and explore. PLEASE do not allow children access to the orphaned or injured animal. It is already in shock and consider us as a large predator, so any undue handling is only going to stress it more and stress is a killer for native animals. Place a towel or similar over the animal, put in a box in a dark, warm quiet room and DO NOT DISTURB. FIRE & WILDLIFE:
Fire Season is not a good time of the year for many of Australia’s' native wildlife. Hazard reduction burns and people burning off also contributes to the number of animals WIRES sees coming into care due to burns & habitat loss. We prefer to think that wildlife can run or fly away from a fire. But this is not always that easy, as was the case for a young Echidna that came into WIRES care recently. So How Do You Burn Off Safely?
We have found that the safest way to burn off is to start a small fire next to your burn pile and feed the logs, sticks etc onto the smaller fire. Alternatively start burning from one side of your burn pile only. This will leave an escape route for most wildlife. Probably the best solution, these days, is to compost rather than burn off. Better for the planet and all our wildlife that make these piles their home. But most importantly check your burn pile before you light it.

Emergency information for birds
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